Caroline Jay

Lecturer

Web Ergonomics Lab, Information Management Group research group

Caroline Jay

This year I invited back several of last year's graduates to talk to current students about the work they are now doing in industry. Seeing graduates join the leading companies in the field is a pretty good indicator of success!

I have worked at The University of Manchester since I completed my PhD, first as a Researcher and then as a Lecturer. The School of Computer Science has a friendly, collegiate environment, with great support for both research and teaching.

It's always exciting to take part in high-profile projects. Some of my career highlights include work on a transatlantic virtual environment, allowing people in the UK and US to touch, which was featured in New Scientist, and a study tracking the eye movements of people viewing paintings, which was on the BBC news.

Research

I research the design of user interfaces in numerous fields, including the Web, Healthcare, Television, Virtual Reality and eScience. I focus mainly on modelling how people perceive and use digital information. In particular, I am interested in determining how we can predict perception of and interaction with complex user interfaces without prior knowledge of the user's task.

I am currently working with the BBC, exploring how to present additional programme content on smartphones and tablets to complement television broadcasts, and with Fastbleep, a medical education organization, to develop software to improve training for medical students.

I enjoy trying to think outside the standard research paradigms, and look at problems in a new light. My work is cross-disciplinary, and often starts by asking how our understanding of human perception and cognition can improve the way we design technology. Increasingly, I'm also asking what the way we design technology and create software can tell us about the human brain --- and what this will mean for the future of computing.

Teaching

I always try to include two key ingredients in the course units I teach. The first is involving industry, to ensure that the content is up to date and has real value in terms of employability. The second is encouraging students to ask, 'why?'. For example, is this the right process to follow or method to use? What can research tell us? How can we gather data to help us make the right decision, whether we're trying to solve a performance issue, or work out which software engineering process our team should be following?

This year I invited back several of last year's graduates to talk to current students about the work they are now doing in industry. Seeing graduates join the leading companies in the field is a pretty good indicator of success!

One of the aspects of teaching I enjoy the most is getting to know students, and I hope they remember me as someone with a genuine enthusiasm for the subjects I teach, who is approachable and interested in supporting students in their studies.

 

Find out more about Caroline and her research.

▲ Up to the top