• Papers Accepted at W4A 2011 Hyderabad, India

    Published: Thursday, 10 February 2011

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    The Web Ergonomics Lab has had two papers accepted at the [externalLink href="http://www.w4a.info/" title="8th International Cross-Disciplinary Conference on Web Accessibility" display="8th International Cross-Disciplinary Conference on Web Accessibility"] in Hyderabad, India. The first, AJAX Time Machine, is a communication paper and describes a technique of allowing users to review all the states a page has been in, and to step backwards or forwards through these states at their own pace. The second, Improving the Accessibility of Dynamic Web Content for Older Users is a Microsoft Challenge paper and describes a system for assisting older Web users as they interact with Web 2.0 content.

    AJAX Time Machine
    Andy Brown and Simon Harper
    Many modern Web pages update parts of their content, and this is often automatic. This allows a ‘clean’ user-interface and information-rich pages. Keeping up with updates or recovering from mistakes can be a problem, however, as it is often not possible to revert a page to a previous state. This can be particularly problematic for users with poor literacy or cognitive disabilities, the elderly, or for users of assistive technologies. For pages that use these technologies to be truly accessible for all, they must afford users sufficient control over updates, to allow them to read and use the information available before it disappears forever. While applying good practice during page design and implementation can provide this, there are many pages for which information changes too rapidly for the user. We propose to supplement assistive technologies with a Web page ‘time machine’ that will allow users to review all the states a page has been in, and to step backwards or forwards through these states at their own pace.
    Improving the Accessibility of Dynamic Web Content for Older Users
    Darren Lunn and Simon Harper
    The Web is changing. The much vaunted Web 2.0 sees once static pages evolving into hybrid applications. Content that was once simple to surf is now becoming increasingly complicated due to the many areas of dynamic content “dotted” throughout the page. In previous studies, we have shown that unlike younger users, older users have more varied interaction patterns when using dynamic content. In addition, some older users are not aware of what to expect when interacting with dynamic content and show signs of hesitancy and uncertainty when completing tasks. In this paper, we present a tool designed to assist older uses as they use Web 2.0 content and reduce the hesitancy and frustration that was previously identified.
    gravatar Simon Harper
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