Seminars

Our seminar series is free and available for anyone to attend. Unless otherwise stated, seminars take place on Wednesday afternoons at 2pm in the Kilburn Building during teaching season.

If you wish to propose a seminar speaker please contact Antoniu Pop.

 

The Craftsperson and the Scholar

  • Speaker:   Dr.  James Hetherington  (University College London)
  • Host:   Robert Haines
  • 11th February 2015 at 14:00 in Kilburn L.T. 1.4
Abstract
The production and maintainance of software is an important part of research in many fields. Yet code is often lost at the end of projects, and unusable by anyone other than the researcher who created it.In this presentation, Dr James Hetherington, founding leader of the UCL Research Software Development Team, will discuss the relationship of software engineering best practice to the construction and maintenance of research code, and the effort to find a place in UK HEIs for Research Software Engineers. He will provide some practical tips on coding for research, and give examples of how the UCL team collaborates with researchers to produce readable, reliable, and efficient scientific software.
Biography
Dr James Hetherington has been working as a research programmer, both academic and industrial, for fifteen years in diverse fields including physics (at Cambridge and CERN), physiology (UCL Centre for Mathematics and Physics in the Life Sciences and Centre for Computational Science), engineering (The MathWorks, makers of MATLAB) and environmental sciences (AMEE, an environmental impact modelling startup).

As founder of UCL?s Research Software Development Team, he has built the group through grant income over two and a half years to a team of 6, and helped create effective research software in fields from ancient Babylonian archeology to radio astronomy and from modelling the future of UK housing stock to brain blood flow modelling. As chair of the UK Community of Research Software Engineers and a Fellow of the Software Sustainability Institute, he is helping sustain the future of the UK Research Software base.)
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