Computer Systems Engineering (3 Years) [BEng]

Global Contexts of Business and Management


Unit code: BMAN21012
Credit Rating: 10
Unit level: Level 2
Teaching period(s): Semester 2
Offered by Alliance Manchester Business School
Available as a free choice unit?: Y

Requisites

None

Additional Requirements

BMAN21012 is a free choice option for students with prior agreement from their home schools. Core for BSc&MChemChemwBM, CSwBM, MathswBM, MPhys&BScPhyswBM.

Pre-requisites - None

Co-requisites - N/A

Dependent Course Units - N/A
 

Aims

To explore the nature of the increasingly integrated and complex world economy, discussing the role of economic, cultural, political, and organizational integration driven by 'globalization'.  To explore the benefits and drawbacks of globalization by highlighting the conflicts and disturbances that go hand in hand with international integration and development.

Overview

To explore the nature of the increasingly integrated and complex world economy, discussing the role of economic, cultural, political, and organizational integration driven by ‘globalization’.  To explore the benefits and drawbacks of globalization by highlighting the conflicts and disturbances that go hand in hand with international integration and development.

Teaching and learning methods

Methods of delivery - Lecture/Tutorials

Lecture hours - 10 (1 hour per week over 10 weeks)

Seminar hours - 8 (1 hour per week over 8 weeks)

Private study - 82

Total study hours - 100

Total study hours: 100 hours split between lectures, classes, self study and preparation for classes, coursework and examinations.

Informal Contact Methods
1. Office Hours: Fridays 11am
2. Other : Email to arrange private meeting.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this unit successful students will be able to:

1.Appreciate the changing nature of the global economy and how the process of globalisation is creating opportunities and challenges for corporations, managers and workers.

2. Have an understanding of the ways in which globalization is implicated in the make-up and change of political, social and cultural systems.

3. Develop a critical understanding of important contributions to academic literature on globalization, both mainstream and alternative.

Assessment Further Information

100% Exam

 

Syllabus

We live in a world of economic and political turbulence. The nature of that world, its dynamics and transformation, have profound implications for every aspect of our lives. This is as true for the operations of businesses and the experience of managing and working for them - both nationally and internationally - as it is for matters of politics and states, culture and identity. In today’s global economy an international perspective on business is not only important for business students but also crucial for social scientists, humanities, sciences and other majors, who need to equip themselves with such knowledge.

The main objective of the course is to broaden the students understanding of the challenges and opportunities of a globalizing world. The aim of this module is to focus on the strategic challenges confronting international firms, by exploring the various economic, political, and cultural issues that confront firms, managers, workers, and consumers in today’s global marketplace. The course will be taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and readings, and will provide a fundamental introduction to the themes and literature of globalization.

Recommended reading

Steger, M. (2013), ’Globalization: A Very Short Introduction’. Chap 1, Oxford: OUP, 3rd edition

Additional Reading:
Dicken P. (2010). ‘Global Shift: Mapping the Contours of the World Economy’, Sage Publications (6th edition). Chap 1




 

Feedback methods


• Informal advice and discussion during lectures and seminars.

• Generic feedback posted on Blackboard regarding overall examination performance.

• Students can arrange to set up a  meeting to discuss performance if they feel it is necessary.

Study hours

  • Assessment written exam - 2 hours
  • Lectures - 10 hours
  • Seminars - 8 hours
  • Independent study hours - 80 hours
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